Maine Quality Counts announces Webinar Series focusing on Children’s Health

Maine Quality Counts announces Webinar Series focusing on Children’s Health

This year, Maine Quality Counts are delighted to offer a new QC for Kids Webinar Series:

Jumpstarting the Conversation on Children’s Health: What we have learned over the past five years, where do we go next for children’s health care quality, and how do we move it forward.

WHEN: Webinars will be the 2nd Thursday of the Month, 12 noon-1 PM. Check the MRBN calendar for the topics each month!

WHERE: hosted on ZOOM

The zoom link is: https://zoom.us/j/5211733487 or 14086380968,,,5211733487#

CME is available.

The first webinar will be Thurs. October 13, 2016: 12N-1 PM with Steve DiGiovanni, MD, Maine Medical Center Pediatric Clinic, and Amy Belisle, MD, Maine Quality Counts, discussing “New Resources for Primary Care Providers on Developmental Screening and What Have We Learned about Screening over the Last Five Years? Understanding the New Survey of Well-Being of Young Children (SWYC) tool, Billing Codes, and Community Resources.”

Many practices in Maine are using the ASQ and PEDS for screening.  The SWYC is a new tool out of Tufts that is recognized as a screening tool and we want partners in the Developmental Systems Initiative (DSI) to be aware of the tool and how it is scored in case you get referrals from primary care providers who are using it.  Dr. DiGiovanni will talk about the work happening to implement the SWYC in Maine Medical Partner Practices. We hope that you will join as we continue to work on raising developmental screening rates and understand the challenges. Maine’s developmental screening rates at ages 1, 2, and 3, based on MaineCare data from 2011-2015, have increased  from 1-3% to over 21-28%.  As we see big improvements, we also need to continue to work to get all kids screened and started in early intervention services is and as needed.

Please join us for the conversation. Register here

Join the Conversation!
theMRBN@gmail.com
Translate »